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The effectiveness and safety of ginger for pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting: A systematic review

  • Author Footnotes
    c Tel.: +61 0414 531 089; fax: +61 07 3368 4063.
    Mingshuang Ding
    Footnotes
    c Tel.: +61 0414 531 089; fax: +61 07 3368 4063.
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Queensland, Herston QLD 4029, Australia
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  • Author Footnotes
    d Tel.: +61 8 8302 2846; fax: +61 8 8302 2168.
    Matthew Leach
    Footnotes
    d Tel.: +61 8 8302 2846; fax: +61 8 8302 2168.
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia
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  • Helen Bradley
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author. Tel.: +61 8 8302 2659; fax: +61 8 8302 2168.
    Affiliations
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Division of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, North Terrace, Adelaide SA 5000, Australia
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    c Tel.: +61 0414 531 089; fax: +61 07 3368 4063.
    d Tel.: +61 8 8302 2846; fax: +61 8 8302 2168.
Published:August 30, 2012DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2012.08.001

      Abstract

      Background

      Ginger has been used throughout the world as a therapeutic agent for centuries. The herb is increasingly used in Western society also, with one of the most common indications being pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting (PNV).

      Objectives

      To examine the evidence for the safety and effectiveness of ginger for PNV.

      Methods

      Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of ginger and PNV were sourced from CINAHL, the Cochrane library, MEDLINE and TRIP. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) tool.

      Results

      Four RCTs met the inclusion criteria. All trials found orally administered ginger to be significantly more effective than placebo in reducing the frequency of vomiting and intensity of nausea. Adverse events were generally mild and infrequent.

      Conclusion

      The best available evidence suggests that ginger is a safe and effective treatment for PNV. However, there remains uncertainty regarding the maximum safe dosage of ginger, appropriate duration of treatment, consequences of over-dosage, and potential drug–herb interactions; all of which are important areas for future research.

      Keywords

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