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Job satisfaction and sustainability of midwives working in caseload models of care: An integrative literature review

      Abstract

      Background

      Demand for caseload midwifery care continues to outstrip supply. We know little about what sustains midwives working in caseload models of care.

      Aim

      This review systematically identifies and synthesises research findings reporting on factors which contribute to job satisfaction, and therefore the sustainability of practice, of midwives working in caseload models of care.

      Methods

      A comprehensive search strategy explored the electronic databases CINAHL Plus with Full Text, MEDLINE, PubMED, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus. Articles were assessed using the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool. Data analysis and synthesis of these publications were conducted using a narrative synthesis approach.

      Findings

      Twenty-two articles were reviewed. Factors which contribute to the job satisfaction and sustainability of practice of midwives working in caseload models are: the ability to build relationships with women; flexibility and control over own working arrangements; professional autonomy and identity; and, organisational and practice arrangements.

      Conclusion

      Insights into the factors which contribute to the job satisfaction and sustainability of practice of midwives in caseload models of care enables both midwives and healthcare administrators to more effectively implement and support midwifery-led caseload models of care which have been shown to improve outcomes for childbearing women.

      Keywords

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