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Midwife-led continuity of care increases women’s satisfaction with antenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care: North Shoa, Amhara regional state, Ethiopia: A quasi-experimental study

  • Solomon Hailemeskel
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author at: Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Debre Berhan University, Postal address: 445, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia.
    Affiliations
    School of Midwifery, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia

    Department of Midwifery, College of Health Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
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  • Kassahun Alemu
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia
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  • Kyllike Christensson
    Affiliations
    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institute, Sweden
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  • Esubalew Tesfahun
    Affiliations
    Department of Public Health, College of Health Science, Debre Berhan University, Debre Berhan, Ethiopia
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  • Helena Lindgren
    Affiliations
    School of Midwifery, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia

    Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Division of Reproductive Health, Karolinska Institute, Sweden
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Published:January 20, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wombi.2022.01.005

      Abstract

      Background

      The provision of midwife-led continuity of care (MLCC) is effective in high-resource settings in improving maternal satisfaction. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of MLCC on women’s satisfaction with care in a low-income/resource setting.

      Method

      A study with a quasi-experimental design was conducted from August 2019 to September 2020 in four primary hospitals in the north Shoa zone, Amhara regional state, Ethiopia. A total of 1178 low-risk women were allocated to one of two groups; the MLCC (intervention group) that received all antenatal, intrapartum, and immediate postnatal care from a primary midwife or backup midwife) (n = 589) and the shared model of care (SMC) group that received care following established practice in Ethiopia, care from different staff members at different times) (n = 589). Data for this paper were collected using face-to-face interviews at the women’s home at the end of the postpartum period. The study’s outcome was the mean sum-score of satisfaction with care through the antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal period continuum, where mean sum-scores range from 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest).

      Findings

      Compared with SMC, MLCC was associated with statistically significantly higher satisfaction with all continuity of care (4.07 vs. 2.79 adjusted mean difference 1.27, 95% CI 1.18–1.35; p < 0.001), during antenatal care (4.14 vs. 2.81 adjusted mean difference 1.33 (95% CI 1.22–1.52), intrapartum care (3.83 vs. 2.71 adjusted mean difference 1.06 (95% CI 0.88–1.23) and postnatal care (5.46 vs. 3.71 adjusted mean difference 1.75 (95% CI 1.54–1.94)).

      Conclusion

      MLCC increased women's satisfaction with maternity care for women at low risk of medical complications. These findings confirm that the MLCC model will be applicable in the Ethiopian health care system with similar settings.

      Keywords

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